Search for your sports books:

MoneyMap

Read Review
<back to archive

Olympic Almanac By Stan Greenberg

Release date: 21st May, 2012
Publisher: Sportsbooks Ltd

List Price: 12.99
Our Price: 8.44
You Save: 4.55 (35%)
Buy Now

Stan Greenberg, who has produced his eighth comprehensive record of Olympic reference, was originally captivated by the 1948 London Games, an experience that led to his lifelong love of data and statistics.

He became a founder member of the International Society of Olympic Historians, sports editor of the Guinness Book of Records and a statistician for the BBC athletics team between 1968-94. His Olympic Almanac is a fascinating collection of Olympic facts, records and particularly snappy anecdotes which leave readers wanting more.

For example, he tells us that the 1908 Games were originally awarded to Rome, but following the eruption on Mount Vesuvius, the Italians faced financial difficulties, allowing London to step in as a late host.

Elsewhere, we learn that up until 1924, when the first Winter Olympics were held in Chamonix, skating and ice hockey had actually been a feature of the summer Games. We're also told that after the Dutch had applied three times to host the Games, they were finally awarded the 1928 event when Johan Anker won an Olympic gold at the age of 57 years and 44 days.

Greenberg's brisk writing style enables him to provide a brief summary of every Olympics from 1896 to 2010 inside the opening 64 pages before he gets into the statistical nitty-gritty.

It's also interesting to see women's growing involvement in sport - reflected in the number of female participants at each Olympics. Whereas the 1896 Games had 246 competitors, all of whom were men, by 2008, no fewer than 4,611 of the 10,906 competitors were female.

Any sporting event which has been in existence for more than a century is bound to have produced anomalies, controversy and great stories. One in particular stands out. Greenberg tells us that the youngest male medallist (he won gold) was a last-minute participant in the 1900 coxed pairs rowing final, though he is referred to only as "Unknown French boy". There is, writes Greenberg, "an unsubstantiated report that his name was Marcel Depaille," aged no more than ten.

We can prepare to be inundated with tons of Olympic tat and rubbish before London's Games open on 27 July. Sensible folk will, however, have bought a copy of Stan Greenberg's Olympic Almanac well beforehand because they'll need little else to enjoy this year's event.


<back to archive


MoneyMapp


SBOTM Current Top 10

Get It On: How the ?70s Rocked Football By Jon Spurling
Biteback
Read Review Buy Now
Time on Rock By Anna Fleming
Canongate
Read Review Buy Now
41-Love: A Memoir By Scarlett Thomas
Counterpoint
Read Review Buy Now
Anatomy of a Football Scout by Jon Cotterill
Camara Brasileira
Read Review Buy Now
Sweat: A History of Physical Exercise By Bill Hayes
Bloomsbury Sport
Read Review Buy Now
52 Ways to Walk By Annabel Streets
Bloomsbury Sport
Read Review Buy Now
Fit And Proper People By Martin Calladine & James Cave
Pitch Publishing
Read Review Buy Now
God is Dead The Rise & Fall of Frank Vandenbrouke By Andy McGrath
Bantam Books
Read Review Buy Now
Butler to the World How Britain Became the Servant of Oligarchs, Tax Dodgers, Kleptocrats and Criminals By Oliver Bullough
Profile Books
Read Review Buy Now
A Delicate Game Brain Injury, Sport and Sacrifice By Hana Walker-Brown
Hodder
Read Review Buy Now

© 2004-2022 Sharks Media Limited.