Search for your sports books:

MoneyMap

Read Review
<back to archive

Roy Mac Clough’s Champion By Roy McFarland with Will Price

Release date: 18th April, 2014
Publisher: TM Sport

List Price: £14.99
Our Price: £10.99
You Save: £4 (26%)
Buy Now

Roy McFarland’s expression on the cover of his engaging autobiography has an uncompromising, ‘don’t-mess-with-me’ air about it, although as a player he never needed to threaten opponents.

While he was a teak-tough centre half, McFarland read the game well and was so fast that he was rarely called upon to make last-ditch tackles, preferring instead to dispossess opponents skilfully, invariably becoming the springboard for another Derby County attack.

It was these qualities and others that persuaded Brian Clough and Peter Taylor to call, unannounced, at the McFarland home when 19-year-old Roy was a Tranmere Rovers player and convince him that his future, plus a raft of trophies and international caps, were his for the taking should he move to the Baseball Ground.

The Derby duo spent several hours badgering, cajoling and charming him into signing (for £24,000) before sweeping away from the backstreets of Liverpool as suddenly and dramatically as they had arrived. Following this whirlwind visit, McFarland was on his way to the top.

Young Roy was almost a reluctant professional footballer: he rejected overtures from both Tranmere and Wolves, happy instead to work as a trainee accountant for a tobacco firm. It was only during a trial match, when asked to swap from being a winger to a centre half, that he found his metier and went on to become perhaps England’s best post-war centre half.

Indeed, were it not for an Achilles injury, suffered while representing England in 1974, it’s likely that he would have won considerably more than the 28 caps he eventually accumulated, the last of which came against Italy in 1976.

Of course, he did have the ‘consolation’ of Derby County twice being crowned league champions and this enjoyable tale is littered with a series of original anecdotes in which characters such as Clough, Tommy Docherty and former team-mates feature prominently. Discovering that Dave Mackay’s favourite tipple was Mateus Rosé invariably elicits a wry smile.

Writing an autobiography with the benefit of years of hindsight used to be the norm. Thankfully, Roy McFarland appreciates this, which is why Roy Mac is such a winning read.


<back to archive


MoneyMapp


SBOTM Current Top 10

Get It On: How the ?70s Rocked Football By Jon Spurling
Biteback
Read Review Buy Now
Time on Rock By Anna Fleming
Canongate
Read Review Buy Now
41-Love: A Memoir By Scarlett Thomas
Counterpoint
Read Review Buy Now
Anatomy of a Football Scout by Jon Cotterill
Camara Brasileira
Read Review Buy Now
Sweat: A History of Physical Exercise By Bill Hayes
Bloomsbury Sport
Read Review Buy Now
52 Ways to Walk By Annabel Streets
Bloomsbury Sport
Read Review Buy Now
Fit And Proper People By Martin Calladine & James Cave
Pitch Publishing
Read Review Buy Now
God is Dead The Rise & Fall of Frank Vandenbrouke By Andy McGrath
Bantam Books
Read Review Buy Now
Butler to the World How Britain Became the Servant of Oligarchs, Tax Dodgers, Kleptocrats and Criminals By Oliver Bullough
Profile Books
Read Review Buy Now
A Delicate Game Brain Injury, Sport and Sacrifice By Hana Walker-Brown
Hodder
Read Review Buy Now

© 2004-2022 Sharks Media Limited.